Showing posts with label flash game not loading. Show all posts
Showing posts with label flash game not loading. Show all posts

Fashion hairstyle free game online

Fashion hairstyle free game online


fashion hairstyle free game online,hair games for girls,hair online free games 4 girls,play fashion hairstyle free game online on games-sun.com,Give her the fashionable hairstyle she have always wanted.

Dummy Crusher 2

Dummy Crusher 2


Cause destruction and mayhem in this action packed sequel! Dummy Crusher 2 is here, and it's absolutely crazy! Everything about it is improved, from the amount of action on screen to the variety of weapons you have! You can even control a heat seeking bee

Chamber Door

Chamber Door


Chamber Door

A slave to a mad-man, you and your new friend Eleven must explore the forgotten chambers in search of your master's sleeping love. Solve the puzzles and uncover the truth about the mysteries that surround you. The story is heavily inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Raven', and takes place directly after the events that had transpired in the poem.

Incredible Rabbit's Day

Incredible Rabbit's Day

Play Incredible Rabbit's Day for free! - Incredible Rabbit's Day is an adventure game where you need to walk around there as there is lot of enemies who head your way. You need to avoid them all and follow the road path. Don't be afraid, run as long as possible. This game is really good where it can help to improve your logical thinking. There is lot of stage to play, you need to complete them and win this game.

Hell On Duty

Hell On Duty


Fun cannon shooting game with ragdolls and 60 levels! Help hell inhabitants to get all demons into boilers

New Dead By Daylight DLC That Adds Killer Doctor Available Now

New Dead By Daylight DLC That Adds Killer Doctor Available Now

A new DLC chapter has been released for Dead by Daylight, the multiplayer survival horror game for PC.


Titled Spark of Madness, the expansion introduces a new killer known as the Doctor, a former medical researcher at a secret government black site who used twisted experiments to interrogate detainees. The Doctor utilizes electroshock therapy to attack other players and emits a static field that affects their sanity. The Doctor can also use his electrical attacks to damage generators. The setting for the chapter is a maze-like medical facility called Lery's Memorial Institute.


The Spark of Madness expansion also adds a new survivor named Feng Min. A former e-sports professional, Feng Min can repair generators faster than other characters, and her acute senses can reveal a killer's location.



Dead by Daylight is currently only available on PC, though a PS4 and Xbox One release is on the way this June. The game pits one player in the role of a killer against four others who must outlast and escape the killer's attacks. We gave Dead by Daylight a 6/10 in our review. The Spark of Madness DLC is available now and is priced at $7.

Juicy Bazooka

Juicy Bazooka

Play Juicy Bazooka for free! - Juicy Bazooka is a shooting game where you need to kill those bandits who steal your juice. They're very greed as they steal everything on their way. So, your mission is to kill these bandits by using your bazooka and your ammo will be a watermelon. Shoot their heads and let them stop stealing everything right now!

Xploding Stick

Xploding Stick

Play Xploding Stick for free! - The best way of exploding stick is using different and new techniques.So use S for double punch X for spin kick use D for quick jab and the fantastic C is for a fast face kick. Also use the left and right key to run different directions. Up down keys are for jumping climb up, down.There are also different combinations S x S to perform a triple scissor kick.

Word Cannon

Word Cannon


It's a physics world of chaos. The Word Cannon is your only weapon.

Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review

Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review

Super Rude Bear Resurrection is one of the hardest games I've ever played--but only at times. Certain games, Resident Evil 4 being a famous example, use a dynamic difficulty system, invisibly adjusting to keep the action challenging but not frustrating. Super Rude Bear Resurrection does something similar, only in a much more obvious, tangible way.


It's a hardcore platformer in the mold of Super Meat Boy, but with a novel twist that gives meaning to the countless deaths you'll suffer throughout. Corpses persist after death and can be used to create a safer path through levels (where one false step will send you back to the last checkpoint). In essence, almost every death serves to make the game slightly easier--though you can also clear levels without ever dying. It's a delightful concept that further enhances a game that's already strong thanks to its wealth of ideas and fantastic soundtrack.


At its most basic, Super Rude Bear Resurrection is a fairly straightforward platformer, tasking you with navigating stages filled with all manner of deadly spikes, arrows, swinging axes, more spikes, and creatures that toss snowballs at you harmlessly--until those snowballs just nudge you to your doom. You'll maneuver through levels using simple jumps and wall jumps. You have no offensive capabilities, and the game doesn’t offer any special abilities to unlock or power-ups to find. You could, in theory, complete any level right from the get-go, although it'll likely take dozens--or, more likely, hundreds--of deaths before you're able to consistently overcome the trickiest obstacles.


The level design shows a tremendous amount of care on the part of developer Alex Rose Games. Stages are meticulously crafted to maximize difficulty without feeling unfair, but they're also created in a way that allows for corpses to ease your path. A carcass might block incoming arrows or give you a safe spot in a row of spikes to jump on, and it can destroy certain traps when it comes into contact with them.


It's easy for the corpses to pile up, particularly due to the way Super Rude Bear Resurrection's levels toy with you. The game plays with your expectations and sets up hazards to punish you for relying on anticipation, rather than your reactions. Many deaths stem from hazards located immediately after checkpoints--these are seemingly placed for the explicit purpose of punishing your eagerness to immediately get back into the action after respawning. You can practically hear Alex Rose chuckling to himself every time you rush into an easily avoidable death. That might explain the mocking remarks of your floating companion, who also delivers the story (and jokes), allows you to destroy corpses in your path, and lets you scout out the areas ahead.


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection Review


Super Rude Bear Resurrection isn't an especially long game, although seeking out no-death runs, better leaderboard rankings, secret worlds, and dialogue (easy to miss the first time around) provides ample incentive for multiple playthroughs. The primary upside to not being long is also what's most impressive about Super Rude Bear: it never runs out of steam. It feels fresh from beginning to end thanks to the way it consistently sprinkles in new types of challenges over the course of the entire game. Falling spikes, NPCs with hammers, arrow launchers, homing missiles, spinning lasers--you won't play for long without encountering a new idea.


Some of these new ideas introduce interesting ways of interacting with corpses. Deaths caused by missiles and lasers freeze your body into an ice block. In the case of the missiles, ice blocks can provide stepping stones over a gap or block further missiles from being fired, while lasers pull the ice in, thereby preventing the lasers from reaching you on your next life.


"On the strength of its pacing and basic mechanics alone, Super Rude Bear Resurrection would make for an extremely engaging platformer. The addition of its corpse mechanic elevates it to something greater."


Further adding to the variety are the boss fights littered throughout, each with its own unique gimmick that doesn't feel at odds with the platforming framework of the game. One tasks you with avoiding spikes and the attacks of a breakdancing robot while standing on a rising platform. Another requires you to ride a moving platform through an otherwise standard level while avoiding a flying enemy that attempts to knock you off or crush you. The latter was particularly memorable, as being knocked down doesn't guarantee death; provided you're skilled enough, you can jump off of the boss itself and potentially recover. Whereas the bosses in Super Meat Boy have always felt to me more like obstacles that stand in the way of returning to the regular action, Super Rude Bear's boss stages were among my favorites in the game.


Later levels ask a lot, requiring an almost-superhuman level of precision to complete without a death--an accomplishment I couldn't even begin to sniff over the last quarter of the game. Yet, because of instant respawns and an excuse to continue listening to the stellar soundtrack, I never found myself frustrated, even when a particular section would cause me to die dozens of times. In fact, it was often hard not to laugh as I amassed an abundance of corpses (every one of which is dumped into a pile from the top of the screen at the conclusion of a level, just as a reminder). These attempts where I clearly wasn't going to set a new time on the leaderboards often became fun experiments to see just how much I could screw with the design of the level.



In certain cases, the game actually becomes far too easy with even just a few deaths. Thankfully, if you find that to be the case, higher difficulty settings restrict the ability to destroy traps, leave behind corpses, and even use checkpoints. These options give you the flexibility to make the game as difficult as you want, which is great, since it's most satisfying when played at the highest difficulty you can tolerate. The thrill of making it through a tough level with little help is matched by few other platformers I've ever played.


Not everything is quite so well executed, however. Visually, the game isn’t always clear about where you can safely stand or whether a corpse will protect you--spikes or blades sometimes extend beyond a body but won't hurt you. The lack of an overworld is disappointing, if inessential, but the inability to access leaderboards anytime other than at the end of a level feels like an unfortunate oversight. A glitch when changing difficulties would cause the sound to drop out until I paused and unpaused the action. And certain level elements, such as falling icicles, are occasionally triggered before they should be after a respawn, which requires a quick death to reset. Because this only happened after a death, it never cost me a flawless run, but it was nonetheless a small source of frustration.


For all of these minor gripes, none of them stand in the way of enjoying nearly every second of playtime. On the strength of its pacing and basic mechanics alone, Super Rude Bear Resurrection would make for an extremely engaging platformer. The addition of its corpse mechanic elevates it to something greater, allowing it to simultaneously serve as an extreme challenge for the most diehard platforming fans as well as a game that can be enjoyed by the novice crowd. Super Rude Bear Resurrection demands a lot from you, but the satisfaction of success is immense in the end.

This Open-World PS4/PC RPG Looks Like Zelda And Has No Combat -- Here's Why

This Open-World PS4/PC RPG Looks Like Zelda And Has No Combat -- Here's Why

Yonder: The Cloud Catcher Chronicles catches your eye immediately. With its striking, saturated, stylized scenes, this 3D open-world RPG may remind you of The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker. Developed by a small team (3 staff and 2 contractors) at Australia's Prideful Sloth, Yonder differentiates itself from that game and others in that it has no combat whatsoever.


We played a portion of the game and visited a new biome, which you can see in the gameplay video above. There are eight biomes in all, so what you're seeing represents just a slice of what the game offers in terms of diversity and scope. Note that the video was captured on PC.


Zelda was not the only influence for Yonder. Prideful Sloth director Cheryl Vance says Animal Crossing and Harvest Moon were also touchstones throughout the game's development, something that becomes obvious when you dig into the game's farming system and meet the animals that inhabit the world. Additionally, she mentions a game that might surprise you: Shadow of the Colossus.


"Shadow of the Colossus was really impactful for me from the point of view of how beautiful and empty the world was, and you still enjoyed being in it," Vance said. "Between us and the contractors, we've probably got 100 gaming years under our belts--so a lot of influences in small, little ways, too. So many different things."


Your goal in Yonder is to clear out the "Murk," an evil presence that physically blocks your progression, by collecting sprites throughout the world of Gemea. Sprites are scattered throughout the world, and you also need to complete quests, including farming, to get what you need.


At the start of our gameplay demo, we came across a creature that looked like a buffalo who was chomping down on grass and minding his own business in the middle of a grassy field. Upon approaching the creature, it turned its back and shied away. To obtain the affection of a creature you must find the food it likes. After doing that, floating hearts appear and you're likely to let out an 'Awww' the first time you see this animation. After you've befriended an animal, you can lead it back to your farm where it will stay. You can customize the look and layout of your farm, placing items like stables and stalls on a grid system to your liking.


You must also grow crops, and collect items on quests (including things like gathering wood and cooking food) to curry favor with locals and get the items you need to eradicate the Murk. The Murk descended on Gemea due to an item called the Cloud Catcher becoming corrupted. It is your job to restore it and bring the world to peace again.


But why no combat? Vance told GameSpot that not including combat helps the game potentially appeal to a wider audience.


"That really came down to more of the influence of Harvest Moon and things like it...it's just more of a thing of going, 'What can we do and not wanting to put it in there was sort of the pillar we have, which is the called the 'safe, inviting world.' It's more about being able to load it, not run five minutes, and then get splattered. Our focus was the Nintendo audience, initially, [but now] it's broadened past that, which is nice to see."


Yonder has been purposefully designed to cater to a more casual crowd; those who want to pick up and play and not get frustrated with challenging controls.


"Not everybody wants to die. Once you get into the world, it doesn't feel like [combat] needs to be there. It's not something...it would feel odd, putting it in," Vance said.


Combat can sometimes, for some games, "get in the way" of the story, she explained.


While our Yonder demo was limited to a particular section of the larger world map, when the game launches, people will be able to basically run from one end to the other right from the start. It is this kind of freedom that Vance and Prideful Sloth wanted to emphasize, and combat was seen as something that could have gotten in the way of that open-endedness, she said.


There is a full day/night cycle in Yonder (some objectives and activities are only available at certain times of the day), as well as environmental effects such as rain. On top of that, Yonder has seasons, though our one-hour gameplay demo only brought us six days into the game world, so we did not see how the world changes with each season. One example Vance provided of how a particular season can impact gameplay is that in the winter, lakes will freeze, allowing you to cross where you otherwise could not.


The camera in Yonder is a treat. Presented from a third-person, over-the-shoulder perspective, Yonder's camera is set far enough off the character to provide a wide field of view. Sometimes the camera is low to the ground, which provides a nice effect that frames the world in such a way that you can take in more of what's around you. Prideful Sloth worked with John Nesky, who worked on the camera features for thatgamecompany's acclaimed adventure game Journey.


Yonder launches on July 18 for PlayStation 4 and PC. Prideful Sloth is considering other platforms, though that will depend on if the game is successful. There are only two programmers at Prideful Sloth, Vance reminded us.


Here are some other things you might find interesting about Yonder:


  • When you jump off a high space, you float to the ground with an umbrella.

  • Tools do not break, so once you have an item in your inventory it will always work.

  • Yonder also has a trading/currency system; You can trade items you collect in the world to merchants or sell them.

  • The in-game economy, which is still being tweaked, Vance told us, will respond to your decisions. Flood the market with a lot of one item and its value will drop.

  • The creatures have silly names, including the Fabbit--which is a fat rabbit.

  • Prideful Sloth has a lot of ideas for what it could do for DLC or a sequel, if the first game is a hit.