Showing posts with label flash game zelda. Show all posts
Showing posts with label flash game zelda. Show all posts

Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures

Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures

Amiibo figures have occasionally gone on sale in the past, but if you're in the market for those from the Animal Crossing series, now is as good a time as any to take the plunge.


Among Best Buy's deals this week is a sale on most--but not quite all--of the figures in the Animal Crossing line. This brings the likes of Tom Nook and Mabel down to just $2, as well as Resetti to $3. There's also a three-pack with Cyrus, Reese, and KK Slider for $5, which works out to less than $2 per figure.


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


Now's The Time To Stock Up On Cheap Animal Crossing Amiibo Figures


The key absence here is the Villager, the Amiibo edition of the player's character in the series. That's presumably due to the fact that it's a part of the Super Smash Bros. line of Amiibo figures, rather than the Animal Crossing one. You can see all of the figures on sale here.


Gamers Club Unlocked members, who receive 20% off new games at Best Buy, also see their discount apply here. That brings the prices down to anywhere from $1.59 to $4.


Also on sale is 3DS game Animal Crossing: New Leaf, which was updated last year to support Animal Crossing Amiibo figures. You can pick it up for $17 ($13.59 with GCU) at Best Buy, a small discount off its usual $20 price.


Save My Garden 2

Save My Garden 2

Play Save My Garden 2 for free! - Save My Garden 2 is a strategy where you need to defend your garden from insects invasion. Everyone know that insects is the biggest problem of running a farm. Because they eat everything on our farm such as leaf, fruit and other vegetables. If they're eaten by the insects. Their growth will be bad. So, you need to defend your farm as well. Build some plants to kill these insects.

Street Fighter V2

Street Fighter V2

Play Street Fighter V2 for free! - Fight your way through the ranks and become the ultimate street fighter in his all time classic game

Ice Racer

Ice Racer

Play Ice Racer for free! - Ice Racer is a driving games, in this games you need to test your skill when driving on the ice, you need to pass the ice's mountains and snowy valleys, push your specially designes ice car to the limits and complete all 10 levels with your skill on driving.

JB At The Doctor

JB At The Doctor


JB suffered an accident in one of his concerts and he is making a visit to the doctor.He needs your help to recover from his injuries.You will do a great job and make him healthy again to hold a new concert.

Trap the Zombie

Trap the Zombie

Utilize mouse to get rid of prevents, and trap the zombie prior to this individual wakes up! Don't let your pet slip around theto be able to the particularbecause he will awaken and start a little bit of chaos!

Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs

Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs


Microsoft recently revealed the specs for its Xbox Project Scorpio, so we thought it would be fun to build a PC inspired by the company’s upcoming console (check out the video here). While we won’t be able to recreate the system exactly using off-the-shelf PC parts, since Microsoft uses heavily customized components, it helps that the Project Scorpio is based on the PC’s x86 architecture. We’re also going to benchmark our rig to get a rough approximation of how games might run on Project Scorpio.


Walking You Through Our Xbox Project Scorpio PC Build


Our Xbox Project Scorpio build is actually going to be very similar to our PS4 Pro-inspired PC we built last September. Our new graphics card, the AMD Radeon RX 580, is the most significant change, and because it’s more powerful than the RX 480 we used in our PS4 Pro-inspired PC, we’re also upgrading our power supply. Let’s take a look at all of our components.





Graphics Card


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Project Scorpio uses a six teraflop GPU based on AMD’s Polaris architecture. Considering AMD’s recently released Radeon RX 580 is a 6.1 teraflop graphics card that’s also based on Polaris, we think it’s a great fit for our build here. These GPUs aren’t exactly the same, mind you. Project’s Scorpio uses an integrated graphics solution that offers 2569 shaders, which is more than the RX 580’s equivalent 2304, but the RX 580 has a higher 1257MHz core clock, and tops the console’s 1172MHz speed.


Microsoft’s upcoming console has 12GB of GDDR5 RAM, but only eight gigabytes of it is relegated to the GPU (For reference, the PS4 Pro has 8GB of GDDR5 RAM total). Fortunately for our purpose, the RX 580 graphics card is also equipped with 8GB of GDDR5 video memory. This helps us achieve VRAM parity. Finally, both GPUs also support 4K, HDR, and HDMI 2.0.





Central Processing Unit


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Project Scorpio uses a heavily-custom eight-core AMD CPU. Reports suggest that it’s not based on AMD’s more recent eight-core Ryzen processors, but are more similar to the company’s Jaguar-based accelerated processing units. On the PC side of things, APUs usually take the form of more entry-level dual or quad-core processors that trade in CPU performance for a little more integrated graphics power, but considering we’re using a dedicated video card, we won’t be tapping into any integrated graphics.


This means choosing an equivalent CPU isn’t easy, but we do think there is a compelling case for AMD’s 2012-released FX-8350 CPU, which released right around the company’s Jaguar-based APUs. Like Project Scorpio’s system-on-a-chip (SOC), the FX-8350 offers eight CPU cores. While most games aren’t optimized to use more than four cores, Microsoft says that it's burgeoning DirectX 12 API will be able to leverage more CPU cores in games that take advantage of it.


The FX-8350 4GHz core clock speed does make it faster than Project Scorpio’s 2.3GHz frequency, but considering our computer has to run a full-fledged desktop operating system (Windows 10) on top of the games, there’s a case for having some extra processing power here.





Cooler



Microsoft hasn’t always used the best coolers (Xbox 360, we’re looking at you). While Project Scorpio doesn’t use a fancy water cooler, Microsoft asserts that its upcoming console uses a high-end vapor-chamber cooler, which will help keep the console cool and quiet. Though the FX-8350 comes with a stock cooler, it’s anything but premium, and often sounds like a leaf blower. To help us achieve a little parity in the cooling department, we went with AMD’s higher-end Wraith air cooler.





Motherboard



For our motherboard, we went with Gigabyte’s 970A-UD3P, which offers the AMD AM3+ socket support we need for our CPU. It also offers high quality audio capacitors coupled with an audio noise guard, which should help us get close to parity with Microsoft’s claim that Project Scorpio will offer high quality audio.





RAM


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Compared to traditional PCs, Project Scorpio’s RAM setup is very unconventional. The console uses 12GB of GDDR5 memory, which is a RAM type that’s relegated to graphics cards in the PC space. Microsoft says that eight of the 12GB will be dedicated to Project Scorpio’s GPU.


PCs, on the other hand, use the slower DDR RAM that’s better at handling all-around computing tasks. Because we can’t use GDDR5 as system RAM, we opted to use 8GB of the slower DDR3 memory, which is clocked at 1600MHz. While you can argue we should use only 4GB of system RAM, because DDR3 is slower, coupled with the fact that our rig has a heavier desktop OS to carry, we figured 8GB of DDR3 represents a reasonable compromise.


For any respectable gaming PC, 4GB is not enough. In general, if you have a ton of RAM, it most likely won’t make your gaming PC any faster, but if you don’t have enough, it can create an unnecessary bottleneck. That’s something we wanted to avoid.





Storage



Project Scorpio will offer a one terabyte hard drive. Considering Microsoft’s Xbox One S featured a 5,400rpm solution, we’re going to assume that Project Scorpio’s HDD is going to be the same. As a result, we went with a 1TB 5,400rpm hard drive from Western Digital.





Power Supply


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Project Scorpio will use a 245-watt integrated PSU that Microsoft asserts is very power-efficient. While our EVGA Supernova solution carries a noticeably higher 550-watt output, it offers enough juice to power our system. It, too, is also very power efficient with its 80 Plus Gold rating.





Case



Right now, we don’t know what Microsoft’s upcoming console will look like exactly. Images of the developer kits make it look somewhat similar to the company’s Xbox One S console with its mostly white and black look. Our mid-tower Deepcool Tesseract case will probably be a bit larger than Project Scorpio’s chassis, but it offers enough space to house all of our components. Aesthetically, it’s also mostly white and black.





Benchmarks



The completed build

Considering Microsoft is heavily touting Project Scorpio as a “true 4K” capable console, we wanted to test that claim. We chose half a dozen games available on both the PC and Xbox One, and analyzed how they performed across a wide variety of graphical presets at 4K resolution.





Forza Horizon 3



Microsoft worked with developer Turn 10 Studios to show off Project Scorpio running an unreleased build of Forza at 4K with a 60FPS framerate. While we don’t have access to that build, 2016’s Forza Horizon 3 is on the PC. When we ran the racing game at its ultra preset, it achieved a 35 average FPS. While it was playable, it didn’t hit the 60FPS mark. It wasn’t until we cranked the settings down to the low preset did we start to hit 60. And for whatever reason, we started to see a lot of in-game artifacting here, though that may reflect more on the PC port or AMD’s drivers than our system. It is important to note that Forza Horizon 3, with its open world setting, may not be truly representative of the build that Turn 10 recently produced. There’s also a chance that the developer has access to low level APIs that would make Project Scorpio run the game’s engine more efficiently.





Gears of War 4


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Considering Gears of War is one of Microsoft’s leading exclusive franchises, it was a no-brainer for us to test Gears of War 4, which came out late last year. Fortunately, the PC port of the game has a built-in benchmark. When we ran Gears at its ultra preset at 4K, it achieved a 27 average FPS. Considering most people don’t consider anything below 30 FPS to be playable, we cranked the preset down to high. Here, it achieved a 37.5 average FPS, which crosses that playable threshold. The frame rate was also pretty consistent, so we can definitely see Project Scorpio running the game at 4K with these approximate settings. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get the game running above 60 average FPS. Even on the lowest preset, where textures looked noticeably worse, the PC averaged just 53.8 FPS. This could speak to the quality of the PC port, but as it stands, unless Microsoft can make some significant optimizations, we doubt Project Scorpio will consistently hit 60FPS at 4K with Gears of War 4.





Overwatch


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Overwatch is not very graphically demanding. When we ran Blizzard’s first-person shooter at its ultra preset, our rig averaged 64 FPS. It did hit a low of 44, however, but it was still highly playable overall. We can see Overwatch running in 4K at max settings, or something close to it, on Project Scorpio with smooth framerates.





Rise of the Tomb Raider



Rise of the Tomb Raider is one of the few PC games at the moment that support DX12. When we ran the game’s benchmark at its max preset with 4x anti-aliasing enabled, it averaged 12.2 FPS. That’s super choppy.


It’s important to note that AA is very graphically demanding and makes much less sense at 4K, where the ultra high resolution inherently mitigates most of the jaggies for you. When we disable AA and set the game to its high preset, our rig achieved a 36 average FPS, which is playable. When we lowered the preset to medium, the average frame rate went up to 40.6. Attempting to see if we could reach 60 average FPS at 4K, we turned the settings down to its lowest preset, where it averaged 50.8 FPS. This makes us think Project Scorpio probably won’t run Rise of the Tomb Raider at 60 FPS. If we had to guess, it will probably target around 30 FPS with graphical fidelity set somewhere between high and medium.





Fallout 4


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



At Microsoft's E3 press conference last year, we saw Fallout 4 featured in Project Scorpio’s announcement video, so we wanted to benchmark Bethesda’s open-world RPG on our rig. When we ran the game at its highest preset, it achieved a 39.2 average FPS. It did dip below the 30FPS playable threshold with a low of 28, however. When we disabled anti-aliasing at 4K, the average rose to 45.3 and the game never dipped below 39 FPS. This makes us believe that Project Scorpio can almost max out Fallout 4 shy of a few sensible performance tweaks. Could our rig handle the game at 60FPS? Yes, but we had to turn down the settings to the game’s lowest preset to accomplish this.





VR benchmark


Here's How A PC With Xbox Scorpio Specs Performs



Microsoft also asserts that Project Scorpio is a console that’s capable of delivering “high fidelity” VR, so we put it through the SteamVR benchmark. Here, it scored a “high” 7.4 score. According to Valve, this classifies it as “VR-ready” rig.





Conclusion



Due to hardware and software limitations, you shouldn’t expect our Project Scorpio-inspired PC to run exactly like Microsoft’s upcoming console, but we think there are enough sensible similarities here that should give us a rough ballpark figure of performance. Analyzing the results of our Project Scorpio surrogate, we can see Microsoft’s forthcoming system running games at 4K, though it’s likely that all games won’t run at 60FPS, or will have to make some graphical fidelity compromises.





Coal Express 6

Coal Express 6

Play Coal Express 6 for free! - Play this Train Game in witch you have to carry cargo from one side to another. Due to demand from our fans they asked for yet another sequel for the coal express games. So here it is for your enjoyment and for the people that are playing it for the first time. Go check the rest of our games out too

How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?

Introduction


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?

Prey is the latest immersive sim that taps into elements of System Shock while incorporating the feel of BioShock. The retro-futuristic vibe and Art Deco aesthetic make Talos I look striking, but how well do modern graphics cards hold up with Prey rendered at the highest quality settings? Arkane Studios, developer of last year’s Dishonored 2, ditched the Void Engine--which had some performance and stability issues--and moved to CryEngine to build Prey.


With eight graphics cards from the current generation--six from Nvidia, two from AMD--we put Prey through our own benchmark test. Since the game does not have a built-in benchmarking tool, we had to create our own repeatable sequence to get consistent results.


Methodology


The benchmark sequence began within the Talos I Lobby near the entrance to the Neuromod Division. From there we walked down the stairs to the center of the hall, all while getting a full view of the decor within the lobby area. Once at the center, we panned the camera around 360 degrees to get a feel for performance within the scenery. Then we walked around the main lift and into the TranStar Exhibit room to fight a Phantom that always spawns there. We shot it up with the GLOO Cannon and hammered it with the wrench, which concluded the sequence. By using the FRAPS program (which records frame data), we tracked the minimum, average, and maximum frames per second (FPS) through this 60 second tour.


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


We decided to run this test in three resolutions: 1920x1080 (1080p), 2560x1440 (1440p), and 3840x2160 (4K), all with V-Sync off. We also used the highest graphics preset for Prey (Very High) which includes the following settings:


  • SMAA 2TX (anti-aliasing)

  • 16x anisotropic filtering

  • Full resolution screen space ambient occlusion

  • Full resolution screen space reflections

  • Very High shadow, texture, and object quality


Don’t be shy now; if you need a refresher on a few definitions of these terms, check out our PC graphics settings explainer!


Test Bench


We used the same rig from our previous benchmark stories--For Honor, Ghost Recon: Wildlands, and Mass Effect: Andromeda. It’s equipped with an Intel Core-i7 6700K clocked at 4.0GHz on a Gigabyte Z170 G1 Gaming motherboard. It also has 16GB of dual-channel HyperX Savage DDR4 RAM at 2133MHz. For storage, we have a 960GB Western Digital Blue solid-state drive. Most importantly, here are all the graphics cards included in our tests:


  • Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti (Reference 11GB)

  • Nvidia GTX 1080 (Reference 8GB)

  • Nvidia GTX 1070 (Reference 8GB)

  • Nvidia GTX 1060 (Reference 6GB)

  • Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti (EVGA SC 4GB)

  • Nvidia GTX 1050 (MSI OC 2GB)

  • AMD Radeon RX 580 (Sapphire Nitro+ 8GB)

  • AMD Radeon RX 570 (ASUS ROG Strix 4GB)


As with any big release, Nvidia and AMD put out day-one drivers to help optimize in-game performance. We used the version 382.19 driver for Nvidia cards, and the Crimson ReLive 17.5.1 package for AMD Radeon cards.


Benchmark Results


1080p Results


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


Prey is a breeze to run at 1080p even at maximum settings, if you’re using at least a GTX 1050 Ti. This relatively budget priced card put out an average of 63 FPS in our benchmark and only dipped to 48 FPS in when approaching the Phantom in the TranStar exhibit. The GTX 1050 didn’t fare as well, but still held up playable frame rates by averaging 44 FPS. We’d recommend turning down a few settings like shadows or anti-aliasing.


Our two AMD cards yielded impressive results considering their price. The RX 570 averaged over 80 FPS and never dropped below 60 FPS. The GTX 1060 slightly outperformed the RX 580, but at this point, anything faster is overkill unless you have a 120/144Hz monitor. Diminishing returns in frame rate settled in with the GTX 1070 and above.


1440p Results


Even at 1440p, mid-range cards like the GTX 1060 and RX 580 averaged above 60 FPS. We start to see a little bit more of a difference in performance between the higher-end cards, though they all stayed above 60 FPS through the entire benchmark sequence. Users of high refresh rate 1440p monitors should be happy to know a GTX 1070 will give them enough juice to enjoy their display’s perks.


The RX 570 squeezed out consistently playable frame rates by averaging 52 FPS and never dipping below 40 FPS--impressive for a sub-$200 graphics card. While the GTX 1050 Ti had a decent showing of a 37 FPS on average, it could benefit from lowering a few settings such as anti-aliasing or shadows. Technically, while the GTX 1050 could be enough to make Prey playable at 1440p at lower settings, we’d recommend switching to 1080p.


4K Results


How Graphically Demanding Is Prey On PC?


Our 4K test really let the higher-end graphics cards show what they’re capable of. The GTX 1080 Ti had no problem staying above 60 FPS, getting an average of 79 FPS. We saw a slight hiccup when the GTX 1080 dropped to 49 FPS, but overall, its 63 FPS average felt smooth.


Things started to slow down with the GTX 1070, but the game was still very much playable. The card was able to hold 50 FPS on average and dipped to a minimum 39 FPS. The RX 580 and GTX 1060 fell behind by performing well under the GTX 1070, we’d recommend turning down anti-aliasing with these cards to get extra FPS boost, otherwise you'll want to use the 1440p resolution. The RX 570 squeaked out a 25 FPS average, so performance was less than ideal. As shown in the results, the GTX 1050 Ti is not meant to run games at 4K, and the GTX 1050 makes it simply unplayable.


Conclusion


Prey doesn’t ask much of your system, unless you’re at 4K resolution. Its environments are relatively contained within the Talos I space station, but still look clean and expressive. We don’t have to worry about crazy draw distances or multitudes of enemies hounding you at once (other than pesky mimics zipping across a room), but eye candy still demands a decent system.


If you’re hoping to enjoy Prey at 4K with max settings, you should at least be equipped with a GTX 1070 for playable frame rates. You could also turn down anti-aliasing at 4K to squeeze out extra frames, otherwise you’ll want a GTX 1080 or 1080 Ti for no compromises. Users of 1440p displays will be set with the mid-range GTX 1060 or RX 580 to get consistent 60 FPS at max settings. Those on 1080p displays should be thrilled to know that a GTX 1050 Ti is enough to pump out an average around 60 FPS.


Most systems with modern graphics cards should be in the clear to enjoy the game, so if you’re ready to jump in, check out our nine tips before starting Prey and the nine best neuromods regardless of play style.

Jelly Hop

Jelly Hop


A puzzle game where you have to pay attention to where you step. Each block will count.

Halo 3 Remaster Is Not Happening, Microsoft Says

Halo 3 Remaster Is Not Happening, Microsoft Says

Having already released "Anniversary" editions of Halo: Combat Evolved and Halo 2, Microsoft won't follow those up with a remaster of Halo 3, at least not yet.


Writing on Reddit as ske7ch343, Halo community manager Brian Jarrard said, "OMG stop. There is no Halo 3 Anniversary." This comment came as part of Jarrard's confirmation that Microsoft won't show Halo 6 at E3 2017 next month, though it will have "a little something" to reveal for a different project.


Halo 3 Remaster Is Not Happening, Microsoft Says


Halo 3 was released in September 2007, so some people thought it would be fitting to release a remaster to celebrate the game's 10th anniversary this year. But it's not going to happen, apparently.


If you're looking for some Halo 3 action, the game's Xbox 360 servers are still online, while the game is playable on Xbox One through Halo: The Master Chief Collection.


Microsoft's Halo and Halo 2 Anniversary editions featured remastered campaigns and multiplayer support, along with the ability to switch between classic and remastered graphics.


As for what 343's "little something" is, there's no indication if it's for Halo Wars 2 or something else, like potentially the Steven Spielberg Halo TV show. All will be revealed during Microsoft's E3 2017 briefing, which is scheduled for the afternoon of Sunday, June 11.


The most recent Halo FPS, Halo 5: Guardians, was released back in October 2015 and has received a great deal of post-launch support ever since. Its single-player campaign was the source of some criticism, particularly its story and how it related (or did not) to its marketing. Whatever changes are made, we do know Halo 6 will feature split-screen multiplayer support.


What would you like to see from the Halo series going forward? Let us know in the comments below!


Mega bulder rampage

Mega bulder rampage

Dodge the boulders