Showing posts with label games play on online. Show all posts
Showing posts with label games play on online. Show all posts

Little Nightmares Review

Little Nightmares Review

From its opening moments, Little Nightmares' haunting aesthetic pulls you into its world of existential conundrums. It enthralls you with its eerie atmosphere and makes your heart pound with tense cat-and-mouse style chases. But the curtains close on this psychological puzzle-platformer far too soon, and for better or worse, it leaves you craving more.


Little Nightmares uses its time efficiently to deliver a poignant look at the consequences of sacrificing innocence and its ensuing madness. You follow the journey of Six, a nine-year-old girl trapped in The Maw--an underwater resort filled with monstrous, disfigured inhabitants that tower over her. The background details are never explicitly explained, but it's clear from the beginning that you must escape.



That vagueness continues throughout the game's short runtime, inspiring you to keep pushing forward in search of answers, as you observe vague narrative details in the places you visit. How did Six get trapped in the Maw? What is the Maw's purpose? And who is Six, exactly? These questions persist until the game's thought-provoking conclusion, and they're likely to remain with you after the fact. This lasting ambiguity drives an enticing narrative that keeps you engaged even if the answers it provides aren't entirely clear.


The answers you do discover can be found in the unsettling macabre imagery you encounter. There are many stories to decipher and interpret from the derelict, poorly lit rooms and corridors of the Maw--in fact, it's only a few minutes in that you find the hung corpse of a large man swaying back and forth from the noose that took him. Such sights are commonplace, each effectively reminding you in various disturbing ways of the world's cold, morbid state. The varied environments that serve as the backdrop of your adventure also keep you uneasy; your relative sense of scale is ever-changing, and the frequent, shifting Dutch angles that frame your viewpoint distort your perception of the world. The sound design is just as stirring as the visuals, from the creaking floorboards to the dissonant ambience that fill the Maw's vacant underground chambers. The game's presentation engenders a deep sense of foreboding that makes each moment you spend in it all the more chilling.


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


Little Nightmares Review


In light of Little Nightmares' presentation, the juxtaposition between its cartoonish qualities and the dark mood that permeates its world is striking and distinctive. Its childlike perspective counterbalances its horror. This is reflected in the puerile ways you navigate and interact with the world: you pull up chairs to reach doorknobs, throw a cymbal-banging monkey toy at a button to trigger an elevator, and hug small critters wearing cone-shaped hats to prove your good intentions. This juvenile style of exploration and contact imbues the game with an underlying innocence. As a result, you always feel like there's a sliver of hope, even if it seems like it's continually in jeopardy against the grisly realities you must face.


You're not alone in this world surrounded by iniquity; there are several deformed creatures that stand in your path towards freedom. Those that inhabit the Maw fuel some of the game's most harrowing moments. The blind underground caretaker known as the "Janitor" has long, slender arms that heavily juxtapose his thick frame, while the chef twins are hulking, grotesque creatures that wear the skins of other people's faces as masks. To evade their clutches, you must sneak past them and solve basic puzzles under their noses, like finding a crank to open up a nearby hatch. You also navigate the occasional platforming section during the inevitable moment they spot you and give chase. The moments you spend hiding or running for your life are some of the most thrilling and tense that Little Nightmares has to offer. The suspense is further heightened by how small in size you are compared to them; it feels like the odds are always stacked against you. As a result, every successful escape seems like a fluke, which makes each encounter feel just as riveting as the last. That isn't to say you won't fail a fair number of times. Luckily, the game's run-ins with trial-and-error never overtly punish you, and it usually only takes a couple attempts to overcome even its most challenging sequences.



The adrenaline-fueled chases you have with the game's gruesome enemies are exhilarating, but the moments in between spent platforming and solving puzzles are often too brief and straightforward. Most times you're simply climbing up containers to reach a vent or acquiring a key to open up a path ahead. These rudimentary tasks, while utilized well during chase sequences to create tension and panic, aren't memorable on their own and serve as little more than busywork. Their facile nature keep things moving, aiding in the tight pacing of the adventure. But they're not as fleshed out as they could be, making your efforts to push forward in these sections feel superficial and hurried, especially when compared to your daring escapes from the Maw's inhabitants.


It's likely you'll finish Little Nightmares in one or two sittings; its brief length may diminish the spark of its highs, making you wish there was more to prolong the time it takes to overcome its tense set pieces. But regardless of how you view the time you spend with the game, its strange and distorted world is enough to pull you back in for a second playthrough. The journey to reach its provocative conclusion is filled with unnerving questions and imagery that take hold of your morbid curiosities and pull you deep into introspection. While its puzzles are at times too straightforward, Little Nightmares is a chilling odyssey well worth taking.


Pajama Boy 3

Pajama Boy 3

Play Pajama Boy 3 for free! - Pajama Boy 3 is an adventure game where you need to help this guy to save his friend who get caught there by looking for the key first. You can move your character by using arrow key button. This game is very simple but it's very interesting to play. There is no one can complete this game if they don't concentrate as well. So, be concetrate and get your winning.

Demolition inc flash game online

Demolition inc flash game online


demolition inc flash game online 2014 for boys kids girls,You have been hired by Demolition Inc for 30 days. Complete the daily tasks the best you can in order to keep your job, and finish the month with more money than the other workers! There are

Katies Flower Shop

Katies Flower Shop

Play Katies Flower Shop for free! - There is a new flower shop in town: Blossoms! Katie had the courage to start a new business, a cute flower shop. Help Katie prepare for the grand opening of Blossoms, the flower shop. Your decorating skills are needed in here. There are so many flowers and arrangements and she can't decide how to decorate the flower shop.You can choose from forms, patterns, colors, leaves, stems. Your duty is to combine a few flowers and arrange them into a bright, colorful bouquet. Mix and match in a daring way, don't be shy and use all the colors you have and remember that your art work will steal the spotlight in every home. After you are done arranging the bouquets,click around the shop to change wallpapers, flours, floral arrangements, colors, and much more! While decorating, keep in mind that first impressions are really important and you need to make Blossoms a really welcoming place, a little corner of Eden.Enjoy!

Annie's Valentine Baby

Annie's Valentine Baby


annie and Kriss are very much in love. Cute princess annie is pregnant with her first baby, and it's a girl. This Valentine's Day they are going to a restaurant for a romantic dinner, with great food, candles and flowers. While they are enjoying a great evening together, annie's baby is ready to be born and be held by her lovely parents. Join the lovely couple in the game called annie's Valentine Baby and help the princess give birth.

ControlCraft 2

ControlCraft 2


In ControlCraft 2 you are in charge of your own blue army! Send your troops from one tower to the other and attack the enemy! Set out a strategic plan and don't forget to buy new upgrades at the shop!

Dark Dayz

Dark Dayz

Play Dark Dayz for free! - Dark Dayz is a shooting game where you need to kill those zombies. We need to survive till the last of wave and it might be difficult to do as we only survive for a person only. You need to collect some weapon on your base and also the health medic. Do your best play in this game and show off your shooting skill. Focus is really important to win in this game as we need to defend our base as well.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe: 13 Tips You Should Know Before Starting

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe: 13 Tips You Should Know Before Starting


While Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is an accessible racing game on the surface, it can also be highly competitive. Thanks to the portable power of the Switch, you can now challenge your friends to a race whenever you want--so why not learn how to completely destroy them? We've put together all the best tips for beginners so you can race like a pro.


For more Mario Kart, be sure to read our full review. You can also watch the video version of our Mario Kart 8 beginner's tips, and if you've mastered the racing basics, check out our video on the best shortcuts in Mario Kart 8.






How To Get The Starting Line Boost



If you time it right, you can get a speed boost at the beginning of a race and get out ahead of the first-lap chaos. To get the boost, press and hold A as the countdown fades from 2. If you do it too late, you might get a smaller boost, but if you're too early, you'll stall.






Boost Off Ramps And Jumps To Decrease Your Time



Press R when you're going off a jump or ramp to get a speed boost. Boost-able areas include regular ramps, logs, and wave-like rolling portions of the track. Boosting throughout a race can shave seconds off your time, which can mean the difference between first and second place.





You Can Check Who (Or What) Is On Your Tail



Press X to look behind you during a race. You can use this to avoid oncoming items or opponents--just be careful not to drive off the track while you're seeing who's eating your dust.





Don't Be Afraid To Brake



If you're going into a turn too quickly, it's usually better to slow down than to fly off the track. Don't be shy about braking, especially in the faster engine classes (it's pretty much mandatory in 200cc).





How To Drift Like A Pro




Drifting is imperative for success in Mario Kart 8, since it'll help you turn as tightly and quickly as possible, lower your race times, and prevent you from flying off the track. Hold R during a turn to drift through it--the longer you hold R, the better your speed boost will be when you let go. You'll see sparks flying off your kart that change from blue to yellow to pink. Pink sparks are new in Deluxe and give the best boost, but it's hard to drift long enough to reach that level except on very long turns. (Note that auto-steer has to be off to get pink sparks. See slide 14.)


When and where you should begin drifting depends on your kart configuration (see slides 11, 12, and 13). But as a general rule of thumb (for karts at least), start drifting right before the curved part of the track starts. Bikes have much better handling than karts and require a lighter touch, so if you're new to drifting, start out on karts first to get a feel for it.





You Can Protect Yourself With Items



Rather than using an item immediately, you can carry certain items (like Bananas and Shells) behind you by holding L. When you're targeted by a Red or Green Shell, they'll protect you from getting hit--just don't try it with a Bob-omb, because it'll explode.





There IS A Way To Beat The Blue Shell



If you're in first place and you get a Super Horn, hold onto it for dear life. It can knock away items and other racers, but it's best used to protect you from the infamous Blue Shell, the nearly invincible item that targets the racer in first place. Use the Super Horn while the Blue Shell is hovering over you to destroy it.





Save Mushrooms For Shortcuts



When you get a Mushroom, save it until you reach a shortcut to make the most of it. The added speed from the Mushroom will help you make it over grass or other weird, off-road surfaces that usually stand between you and a great shortcut.


Check out our video on the best shortcuts in Mario Kart 8 if you aren't sure where to start. You can also race against Nintendo employees' ghosts in the Time Trials mode and stay behind them to see some shortcuts and efficient routes.





Coins Give You A Small Speed Boost



Coins are important for unlocking kart parts, but they're also great for racing! Having 10 grants you a very small top speed boost that can make a big difference.





What Do Kart Stats Mean?



Karts have five stats: speed, acceleration, weight, handling, and traction. Press the plus or minus button to see stats in the kart selection screen.


  • Speed: The top speed of the kart under regular circumstances.



  • Acceleration: How quickly the kart gains speed. High acceleration helps you recover more quickly from getting hit or falling off the track.



  • Weight: The kart's weight. Karts with a higher weight can knock away those with lower weights.



  • Handling: The kart's turning ability. High handling helps on tracks with frequent or tight turns and on the faster engine classes (150cc and 200cc). Note that bikes have higher handling than karts and make much sharper turns.



  • Traction: The kart's grip on the road. High traction can help keep you from slowing down too much on off-road terrain or from slipping a lot on smooth tracks.







Characters Have Weight Classes



Kart stats are partially affected by the character you choose. There are three main weight classes: light, medium, and heavy. There's a small amount of variation within them, so always check your kart stats when you change characters.


  • Light: Baby Peach, Baby Daisy, Baby Rosalina, Lemmy, Baby Mario, Baby Luigi, Dry Bones, Koopa Troopa, Lakitu, Bowser Jr., Toadette, Wendy, Isabelle, Toad, Shy Guy, Larry



  • Medium: Cat Peach, Inkling Girl, Villager (female), Peach, Daisy, Yoshi, Tanooki Mario, Inkling Boy, Villager (male), Luigi, Iggy, Mario, Ludwig



  • Heavy: Rosalina, King Boo, Link, Waluigi, Donkey Kong, Roy, Wario, Dry Bowser, Metal Mario (including Gold Mario), Pink Gold Peach, Bowser, Morton




Note: Miis can be any weight class depending on their size.


Heavier characters have higher top speeds but lower acceleration, handling, and traction, so tailor your kart to account for the character you pick.






How To Build The Best Karts



Generally, your performance with a certain kart combination depends on your style. The best way to test new kart parts is to isolate them--that is, equip the standard kart, wheels, and glider, and then only change one category. It's an easy way to see how something like a set of wheels can affect your entire loadout.


For beginners, karts with mid-to-high speed, acceleration, and handling will work best. You can achieve this build easily with a medium or heavy character using the standard kart parts.


Nintendo's record best times on the Wii U version were set with heavy characters using the Sport Bike, Slick wheels, and Parafoil glider, for the most part.





Check Your Settings



There are two new settings in Mario Kart 8 Deluxe: auto-steer and auto-accelerate. They're helpful for new players or anyone who has difficulty racing with the default controls, but they're on by default. If you'd like to race without help, be sure to turn them off before you start. Check these settings by pressing the + or - buttons when on the kart selection screen.


Note that auto-steer will keep you from straying off the track, but it will also prevent you from taking off-road shortcuts and will likely put you at a disadvantage when playing competitively.






Prey Review

Prey Review

For a game so concerned with the perils of futurism, it's ironic that Prey feels like it's trapped in the past. With the Dishonored series, developer Arkane Studios has become torchbearer of the Looking Glass legacy, crafting so-called "immersive sims" from the building blocks of System Shock and its various progenitors. The frameworks of these games are just as formative to the design of Prey, but while the Dishonored titles take ideas underpinning the genre and push them forward, Prey's humdrum execution of these fundamentals leaves it feeling stuck in time.


Set in the year 2032, Prey casts the player as Morgan Yu, a scientist that finds herself--or himself--trapped on Talos I, a space station overrun by a race of highly intelligent aliens called the Typhon. Morgan was involved in the creation of Neuromods, a technology derived from the Typhon that allows humans to augment their abilities. She was also the primary test subject for them, hot-swapping Neuromods in and out of her brain with reckless abandon. During the removal process, the memory of a user is rolled back to its pre-installation state, and since the game begins shortly after some mods are ripped out of her brain, Morgan--and by proxy, the player--starts as an amnesiac.


Prey's opening is its most memorable part, largely due to its own "Would you kindly" moment, and the promise of what it could mean. In the ending of Irrational's BioShock, the revelation surrounding this phrase re-contextualises the events of the entire game to deliver a commentary on player agency. Prey subverts this with an early game twist that lays the groundwork for players to scrutinise their agency in the moment, to question the motivations of characters as they appear, and re-evaluate the impact they're having throughout. It's an opportunity to tell a twisting, paranoia-fuelled story that forces you to second-guess your own character. But sadly, that opportunity is largely wasted. Prey quickly loosens its grip on this narrative thread, allowing it to drift into the background in favour of environmental storytelling that shifts the focus to Talos I itself.


With its fusion of art-deco stylings and utilitarian design, Talos I is initially very striking. It has the deep red furnishings and gleaming gold frame of a baroque hotel but this is abstracted against the blackness of space, visible through giant glass windows. Together with the luminescent blue computer screens and neon stylings of other futuristic technology, Talos I has a distinct visual identity, but it's one that grows tiresome.


Video game worlds are often designed on the same principles as amusement parks, with zones supporting unique themes for variety. Talos I, however, maintains a consistent aesthetic throughout its various areas, breaking the uniformity of its visual design only for the Arboretum, where lush vegetation, towering trees, and snaking vines are entangled with cold space station architecture. Otherwise, the place is comprised of typical living quarters, office areas, and an abundance of science labs in various states of disarray. Logically, the lack of variety makes sense--it's an installation designed to house people that do science, not a funfair. Nevertheless, the lack of variety provides little incentive to stop and admire your surroundings beyond the initial few hours.


Good immersive sims--like BioShock and Dishonored 2--weave stories into their environments. In Prey, however, those stories are limited to either "people were here, Typhon appeared, killed everyone, knocked over furniture, and blew holes in things" or "Typhon were being experimented on here, they got out, knocked over furniture, and destroyed all the expensive science stuff." A space station ruined by a catastrophic event and the hubris of its leaders is evocative in itself, but this is just the outline of events, and without more color Prey's world reveals itself to be vapid and lacking in depth.



Smaller tales involving the people stationed on Talos I can be found by reading emails at computer terminals, and although they provide a little more to latch onto, by and large it's all similarly forgettable. Emails are mostly the kind of thing you'd expect a bunch of coworkers to be contacting each other about: complaining about colleagues, reminding each other about best practices in the workplace, or explaining why that door you really need to get through is locked.


Hidden amongst all the emails and loose papers strewn around environments is the occasional meaningful exchange--like a group arranging a Dungeons & Dragons game complete with character build sheets, a multi-part treasure hunt, details of shifts in Morgan's personality during the Neuromod testing, or theories on the strange abilities the Typhon exhibit. Again, these are effective in creating a sense that Talos I was a real, functioning place where people worked and lived together, but the abundance of mundane notes makes reading them a chore, and overall they feel like filler for an overarching narrative that's stretched thin.


A key part of Prey's story involves presenting conflicting evidence about Morgan's personality before the memory loss, specifically her intent for Talos I and her contingency for a Typhon outbreak. The game wants you to define your Morgan by completing select side-quests that require moral decisions. However, it only serves up a handful of these moments and they come in the form of uninspired missions for characters who seem like distractions from the main narrative instead of pivotal figures in the outcome of the story. Prey makes an honest effort of raising the profile of these people, but it happens late in the game, and when all's said and done, the characters still felt disposable. There's a restraint to Prey that creates a disquieting quality in Talos I, but when this philosophy is extended to its characters, it just makes them fade away.


Prey does occasionally deliver an engaging mission ... but they're few and far between


Who can be blamed for wanting to ignore that guy that asks you to go out of your way to fetch a personal artefact? Or that lady who needs you to expend precious resources battling Typhon to grab her medicine? It turns out, however, these menial tasks are critical to the ending. And when the game laid out the unexpected way it all tied together, the revelation didn't feel earned. Prey does occasionally deliver an engaging mission, such as a hunt for an escaped convict, but they're few and far between, and often end very anticlimactically.


Prey's gameplay experience fares better, but it's uneven and, at times, its systems feel at odds with itself. With limited access to weapons and special abilities, much of the early game feels like a slog. The Typhon are abundant and soak up damage, so you're dumping ammunition into them while they chip away at your health, and then struggling to stay alive since resources are scarce. It feels like the worst parts of survival horror: a punishing war of attrition, but without the cycle of tension and release that makes it enjoyable. This becomes pronounced when you consider that Mimics, the most prevalent type of Typhon enemy in the early stages, have a tendency of appearing in blind spots and catching you off guard.


This aspect of the game is simultaneously exhilarating and infuriating. The Mimics are small, highly mobile creatures that have the ability to shapeshift into innocuous objects around them. This means that you can walk into a room and be completely unaware that a Mimic waits just a few feet away, disguised as a cup or a trash can. While this was effective in creating tension, it also detracted from exploration; I wasn't soaking in the atmosphere as much as I was painstakingly scouring it to get that Mimic before it chipped away at my health, forcing me to use precious healing items. And when I took on a Mimic, the lethargic controls of gunplay coupled with a small, black Mimic darting around the floor of a dimly lit room and leaping off walls made me feel like Mr. Bean.


There are methods to uncover a Mimic before it strikes, most notably by scanning environments using the Psychoscope, but having to put it on every time you enter a room becomes tiresome. The scanner is better suited for rooting out a Mimic once it has revealed itself and skittered away to hide again.


Mimics are eventually joined by Phantoms, which are the result of Typhon reanimating dead human bodies. These wraith-like creatures patrol Talos I and, given their ample health pool, are difficult to bring down early on. They're not particularly interesting to fight since they just close the gap and physically attack you, and they eat up a whole load of resources to successfully vanquish. This enemy type becomes more interesting as elemental variants are introduced, as they can limit the weapons you use, split into multiple attackers, or set the environment on fire. However, for a significant amount of the game, Prey never afforded me the freedom to approach combat how I wanted--it forced me to play conservatively. The scarcity of health packs and ammunition meant that it was in my best interest to sneak by enemies, which was fine most of the time, but became frustrating in situations where they were swarming around an objective.


Prey Review


Prey Review


Prey Review


Prey Review


Prey Review


Prey Review



As the game progresses, Neuromods become more abundant, which in turn means you can unlock abilities that level the playing field somewhat. This is when Prey's combat opens up, and while it doesn't provide as much room for creativity as Dishonored 2, weapon and ability combinations develop a satisfying synergy. The GLOO Cannon, for example, can be used to fire a foam that hardens and immobilizes enemies, at which point a Kinetic Blast can shatter them into pieces. Other powers can compel enemies to fight alongside you for a short period of time, or teleport short distances to get the jump on targets. As newer foes are introduced, it becomes imperative to use the Psychoscope--a helmet with a scanner attached--to research the Typhon and reveal their individual weaknesses, while also unearthing more abilities to unlock.


The downside of using alien powers is that the the turrets littered around Talos I identify you as being part Typhon and open fire. Again, early on this feels like punishment for exploring the more interesting wrinkles of combat, but over time, turrets become less of an issue as they can be hacked or easily destroyed. In its latter stages, Prey's combat feels varied and strategic.


As you venture deeper into Talos I, you'll find Recyclers and Fabricators. You can use these to break down and reassemble junk into useful items ranging from weaponry and Neuromod upgrades to turrets and med packs. Having these went a long way in alleviating the pressures of resource scarcity and empowered me to really approach combat and exploration how I wanted. I could go into any scenario feeling like I had a decent shot of defeating the Typhon and achieving my objective.


Neuromods can also be used to solve some of Prey's puzzles, though these are often based around simply figuring out how to gain entry into inaccessible locations. In most cases these areas are designed to allow a degree of freedom of approach. Typically, the options are obvious: if you don't have a keycard, you can hack the lock, look for a vent to crawl through, or use brawn to move an obstruction. One of the more creative ways to overcome an obstacle is to grab a small object like a cup, use Mimic Matter to turn into it, and slip through small openings. Of course, your approach is dictated by the upgrades you've unlocked, so if you've developed Morgan using a specific ability path instead of diversifying ability upgrades, you may find you're regularly approaching these puzzles in the same way.


While not challenging, these puzzles shine a spotlight on the layout of Talos I. On a small scale, the looping vents, multi-layered rooms, and gravity lifts (which act as arteries throughout the station) show consideration has been given to the physical construction of Talos I. The GLOO Cannon is particularly effective in showing how Prey's environments can fold in on themselves. Its foam hardens when fired at walls, allowing Morgan to use it as a makeshift platform. This makes it possible to circumvent the obvious path in favour of a more diverse approach, highlighting the thoughtful level design.



Where Talos I really shines, however, is when you leave the station entirely, entering space to marvel at it from the outside--which you can do by unlocking specific doors in each area. It's truly fascinating to see how all the pieces fit together and find the alternative entry points into the different parts of the station. Floating through the guts of Talos I really hammered home the scale of the space station. And sandwiched between the hulking construct and the deep, dark infiniteness of space, I felt overcome with a feeling of insignificance. The mixture of cosmic noise and the distant warbles of Typhon floating around, meanwhile, created a strange calm in me; Prey's space exploration was unexpectedly affecting.


Unfortunately, I encountered a number of technical issues with Prey in my playthrough, the most severe of which prevented quest progression entirely. These had to be resolved by loading an earlier save, which meant losing some progress. I also had enemies clip through walls multiple times, the worst occasion being an electricity-imbued Phantom right next to a gravity lift. Its elemental power disrupted the lift and prevented me from using it. Prey also suffers from lengthy loading times when moving between areas, which becomes particularly noticeable when completing side-quests, as they often ask you to dart back and forth between multiple locations.


Another major bugbear is the audio mixing. Prey has the most aggressive and abrasive sound design that I have heard in quite some time. The appearance of a Mimic, for example, is accompanied by an ear-piercing shrill, and since you're often not looking at the Mimic when it appears, the sound feels awkwardly timed and annoying. The soundtrack, meanwhile, is buried under what sounds like a warehouse full of fax machines and dial-up modems all powering up at the same time. Couple that with multiple characters delivering their dialogue in unison and it's pure, maddening, auditory chaos.


Prey is a game of uneven pacing and uninteresting characters. It opens with a poignant, thought-provoking premise, but fails to follow through until the end, when it claims a revelation it doesn't quite earn. Its gameplay falters out of the gate, eventually maturing into something worthwhile, if a bit familiar. As an homage to System Shock it's competent and at times even enjoyable. However, Prey fails to distinguish itself, and next to immersive sim contemporaries such as Dishonored, it feels stagnant.


Mechs

Mechs


Mechs

Just Deliver a cube to a goal. Increase or decrease a surround figures. This is your purpose. You must have an energy to increase figures. Decrease to get energy. Lets go!

Tower Siege!

Tower Siege!

Play Tower Siege! for free! - Tower Siege! is a board game. In this game you need to match or connect three blocks or more to get coins. You can collect the coins and then use it to upgrade your tower. Make sure, you do your best concentration here and be focus. Because you need to focus in order to complete the stage as the stage isn't easy as we thought. Let's do your best play. Complete all stage and let see what can you do completing all stages.

10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch

10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch

10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



The excitement around Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is at fever pitch, and despite the fact that it's a port of a Wii U game, it feels right at home on Switch. That got us thinking about what other Wii U games we want to see make a comeback----especially those of us who never owned a Wii U.


After all, it would be a shame for exclusives like Bayonetta 2 to remain landlocked on a system Nintendo is quickly phasing out. Not to mention that Switch also makes for a wonderful multiplayer console, even on the go. The thought of playing Super Mario 3D World or Super Smash Bros. at the drop of a hat is a reality we would love to be a part of; one we hope Nintendo is planning to make possible.


Considering Nintendo only has control over its own properties, we narrowed down the list of Wii U games we want to see on Switch to first-party published games only. But you never know: Nintendo has a lot of sway at the moment with the success of Switch, and a publisher or studio need only look at Switch sales numbers .


If you had the chance to pitch any Wii U game to Nintendo for a Switch revival, what would you choose? Take a look at our picks, and let us know your thoughts and suggestions in the comments below.






Super Mario Maker


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"The first time I discovered that not only could I make a giant, flame-spewing piranha plant, but I could also make it fly, I cackled with horrible glee at the possibilities. And for the first time in a creation-focused experience, I look forward to returning again and again for more than just the amazing levels I know other people will create. I want to keep making my own levels better. The game won't necessarily turn you into the next Shigeru Miyamoto, but you can almost feel a little bit of that magic rubbing off every time you upload a new creation." - Justin Haywald, 9/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Super Mario Maker for Wii U





Super Mario 3D World


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"Sure, co-op play is hardly a game changer, but when so much of 3D World is so successfully built upon a bevy of brilliant ideas, this can be forgiven. Everything that you can see and do within its enchanting levels is so bright, colourful, and full of wonder that it's impossible not to be taken in by its charms. Mario has always had that uncanny ability to cross the boundaries of age and gender, to bring a smile to the face of every player who crosses his path. Super Mario 3D World is no different. This is a dazzlingly inventive game that brings the fun in spades, and will leave you grinning like a loon from start to finish." - Mark Walton, 9/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Super Mario 3D World for Wii U





Super Smash Bros.


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"Between the Masterpiece Collections, which are short demos of the classic games that inspired Smash Bros., the many fighters and stages, the deep character customization for fine-tuning your fighters to suit your play style, and the extensive screenshot editing tools, there’s just so much to do. With the Wii U release, Smash Bros. has fully realized its goals. There’s something here for nearly everyone--from young to old, from novice to expert--presented almost without compromise. Super Smash Bros. Wii U invites everyone to join in its undiluted, joyous celebration of the broad community that Nintendo has built over the past forty years." - Daniel Starkey, 9/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Super Smash Bros. for Wii U





Bayonetta 2


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"Bayonetta 2's combat is so expertly constructed, and its presentation so joyously insane, that you'd have to try so very hard to get bored of it all. In a year filled with the promise of ever more elaborate experiences on all the shiny new hardware, that Bayonetta 2--a homage to classic game design and escapism--should be the most fun I've had playing a game all year is unexpected. But maybe it shouldn't have been. After all, its predecessor still stands as one of the finest games of its genre. To have surpassed that with Bayonetta 2, and to have created a game that will be remembered as an absolute classic, is nothing short of astonishing." - Mark Walton, 10/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Bayonetta 2 for Wii U





Pikmin 3


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"Pikmin 3 doesn't offer much growth from previous games in the series, and actually takes a step backward in some areas. But there's no shame in falling just short of the classic offerings that came before it. Scouring the environment for all of the hidden goodies is eminently enjoyable because of the clever problem solving you have to employ, and the competitive mode should test the strength of any friendship. There's nothing quite like Pikmin out there, and its delightful combination of survival strategy and unflinching cuteness should entertain you throughout this lengthy adventure." - Tom Mc Shea, 8/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Pikmin 3 for Wii U





Xenoblade Chronicles X


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"Mira and its inhabitants are awe-inspiring, and experiencing everything X has to offer is a monumental and rewarding task. It makes the journey consistently interesting by giving you intricate control over your characters' abilities and gear, and by offering a wealth of new toys to play with as time goes on. You will roll your eyes at characters, and bemoan the unnecessary story padding, but these frustrations are quickly forgotten when you head into the wilderness in search of unexplored territory and unforeseen challenges. X is a grand adventure that satiates your appetite for exploration and combat in ways that few games ever do, but because getting started is half the battle, it’s an experience reserved for dedicated players who have the patience and energy to unearth its greatest treasures." - Peter Brown, 8/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Xenoblade Chronicles X for Wii U





The Legend of Zelda HD Collection (Wind Waker HD and Twilight Princess HD)


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



Wind Waker: "The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD is a loving restoration of a bold and beautiful adventure, with Nintendo shifting some elements of the original game's aesthetic, and streamlining the pace where it had occasionally sagged. The Wind Waker is a game about a young hero saving the world from the past actions of old men, but its HD update reaffirms that Nintendo's most colorful Zelda game remains timeless." - Martin Gaston, 8/10


Read: GameSpot's review of The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker HD for Wii U


Twilight Princess: "Twilight Princess HD is unmistakably a product of its time; one that was cursed from birth with a warped identity. Crafted during anxious times for Nintendo, developed for two consoles simultaneously, this was the GameCube's last hurrah, a Wii launch title, and a defining test for motion controls (which have been stripped out). Perhaps now, ten years later, it can finally be remembered how it ought to be; the dark and violent showpiece of a treasured series." - Rob Crossley, 9/10


Read: GameSpot's review of The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess HD for Wii U





Pokken Tournament


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"It’s a testament to the quality of Pokken Tournament that I just wish there were more characters. There’s more than 600 Pokemon now and Pokken Tournament features just 16 of those. Perhaps this is an unfair criticism since this number is similar to most fighting game rosters at launch, but I simply need more. I need Hawlucha.


Nintendo’s Wii U provides a paucity of fighting games, but Pokken Tournament has redeemed that drought by being one of the best on any platform. Frequently magnificent to look at, delicately designed, and rewarding for players across all skill levels, it’s the Pokemon fighting game deserving of a 20-year wait." - Tamoor Hussain, 9/10


https://www.gamespot.com/reviews/pokken-tournament-review/1900-6416381/





Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



Tokyo Mirage Sessions #Fe is gorgeous, fun, and a smart collaboration all around. Backtracking through dungeons and running up against tedious bosses can bring the momentum down, but overall the game is something worth exploring. After a few dozen hours the semi-ludicrous story and systems set in front of you feel so comfortable together that this mashup of developer Atlus' most popular franchise and Intelligent Systems' beloved strategy RPG seems like it was destined to be." - Alexa Ray Corriea, 8/10


Read: GameSpot review of Tokyo Mirage Sessions #FE for Wii U





Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker


10 Wii U Exclusives That We Want Ported To Switch



"From goombas in swim rings that flap their little feet underwater, to the tiny birds that land on Toad's head when he's idly wasting time, Treasure Tracker has a lighthearted and lovable presentation. It has the right mix of atmosphere and challenging puzzles to keep you engaged, and it's a great experiment within the larger Mario universe. It may have started out as a minigame, but with its original take on the Toad character and a large number of enjoyably tricky puzzles, it's great to see it in the spotlight it so truly deserves." - Peter Brown, 8/10


Read: GameSpot's review of Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker for Wii U





Devil's Ride

Devil's Ride

Play Devil's Ride for free! - Devil is on the ride. In this extreme ride game you have new challenges in every level and various obstacle to clear. Get over the cliffs and jump across the chasms to Complete all the levels.

Pro Quarterback

Pro Quarterback

Play Pro Quarterback for free! - Pro Quarterback is a sport games, in this game you will be as rugby player and your mission is for getting a winning, then you can play with another strong team, you must understand, teamwork is number 1, so build your best teamwork and also best strategy